VISUAL ARTS 

Maria Lino FIU MFA '08: Bread Work FREE
Monday, February 1, 2016
Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Road
305.348.7500 mbus.fiu.edu
Bread Work springs from an interest in the rhythm and repetition of manual labor and from the love of bread, not only as food, but as a social and cultural identifier, as well as an ephemeral object of visual beauty. Exhibition continues through February 17, 2016.

Monsters & Muses
On view through February 10, 2016
Opening Reception: February 3, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
ArtCenter's Studio 211, 924 Lincoln Road
www.artcentersf.org
In this dual interpretation of the divine feminine, Loren Abbate and George Goodridge examine personal perspectives and impressions of the empowered female. Both their male and female attitudes reflect significantly different identities and idealisms of the feminine which consider attraction, seduction and spiritual nuances.  Varied mixed media, sculpture, monoprints and three-dimensional paintings will be presented.

MFA Girls' Eye View FREE
Opens Thursday, February 4, 2016
Opening Reception: Friday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Road
305.348.7500 mbus.fiu.edu
The co-Curators of the upcoming MBUS exhibition MFA Girls Eye View: American Collages and Photomontages invited FIU's female MFA-Visual Arts students to respond to the current American socio-political environment. The eleven artists who agreed to participate in the show are painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers, videographers, conceptual artists, sculptors, and Fibers-artists. However, for this project they have all agreed to pause their regular practices in order to address an issue of their choosing, in collage or photomontage form.  Exhibition continues through March 25, 2016.

Exhibition: MAA Students Thesis Projects FREE
Opens Monday, February 8, 2016
Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Road
305.348.7500 mbus.fiu.edu
Coordinated with Professor Gray Read with FIU Master of Arts in Architecture advanced thesis work by Sara Garaulet, Jeanne Canto, Manny Ferro, Selene Varela, Marco Campa, and Marny Pareda.  Exhibition continues through Friday, March 11, 2016.

"Earthbound Musings" by Carlos Spartacus FREE
Continues through February 12, 2016
Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Road
mbus.fiu.edu
"My conceptual art is rooted in Buddhist philosophy where I concentrate my energy into the present moment. Whether it is sensory responses through mark making, or responding to the surface of a wall, I am always conscious about the moment I am creating. Philosophical ideas of non-attachment to material objects are relevant in my wall work, as they are impermanent pieces with a life and death of their own. Similarly, the continual repetition of Zen-like scraping is evident in my poetic wall pieces, where I remove vinyl text that expresses something I have personally written. The embrace of life itself is a theme I observe in my art. I make art as a way to practice my spirituality".  –Carlos Spartacus.

Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage
Continues through February 14, 2016
Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, 301 Washington Avenue
305.672.5044 www.jmof.fiu.edu
This exhibition details the dramatic recovery of historic materials relating to the Jewish community in Iraq from a flooded basement in Saddam Hussein's intelligence headquarters, and the National Archives' recovery work in support of U.S. Government efforts to preserve and make these materials available. The materials include more than 2,700 Jewish books and tens of thousands of documents in Hebrew, Arabic, Judeo-Arabic and English, dating from 1524 to the 1970s. Exhibit highlights include 23 original items, such as a Hebrew Bible with commentaries from 1568 - one of the oldest books found; Babylonian Talmud from 1793; Torah scroll fragment from Genesis - one of the 43 Torah scroll fragments found; and lunar calendar in both Hebrew and Arabic from the Jewish year 5732 (1971-1972) - one of the last examples of Hebrew printing in Baghdad. Visitors can also view a fascinating "behind the scenes" video of the painstaking conservation process. The Jews of Iraq have a rich past, extending back 2,500 years to Babylonia; today, only a few Jews are known to remain in the country. This exhibition provides the opportunity to preserve and display the rich cultural heritage of this now-extinct community.

The Future Isn't What It Used To Be
Opens February 17, 2016
Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 17, 7:00 p.m.
ArtCenter's Project 924, 924 Lincoln Road
www.artcentersf.org
In contemporary times, violence is prevalent in our daily lives in the media, television programs, movies and video games. We see war-torn scenes in Afghanistan, stabbings in Israel and state brutality in Venezuela on the news every day. Children grow up playing with toy guns and shooting in video games. Violent scenes are commonplace and it seems as if we have become immune to it…until it hits home. The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be examines violence in general and man-made atrocities and reflects how the future before us looks bleak and far from what we envisioned the 21st century to be. Without explicit and violent scenes, the works in the exhibition challenge the viewer to think about the violence that we humans have inflicted and continue to inflict in this world. Exhibition continues through March 28, 2016.

The Holocaust: How Was It Humanly Possible?
Opens Monday, February 22, 2016
Miami Beach Urban Studios, 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 440
www.holocaustmmb.org
The perpetrators of the Holocaust and their collaborators committed extraordinary crimes. We continue, 70 years after the liberation of Auschwitz to ask:  Were these people aberrations or were they ordinary people simply reacting to extraordinary circumstances? The Holocaust is part of a history that demands the attention of everyone who is part of the human race.  This exhibit, "How Was It Humanly Possible?" presented by the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach, focuses on the individual perpetrators, the foot-soldiers of the Nazis' genocidal policies.  The plan to murder the Jews was conceived by a small circle of dedicated Nazis.  In order to implement their plan, however, they required the collaboration of the masses. Developed by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem and sponsored by the American Society for Yad Vashem. The Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach is pleased to host the premiere and first city of this important traveling exhibition. Exhibition continues through March 4, 2016.

Student-Curated Library Installation Focusing on Cuba
Opens February 25, 2016
The Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue
305.531.1001 www.wolfsonian.org
Examining U.S.-Cuba relations in the early twentieth century, this installation traces American foreign policy from Theodore Roosevelt's "big stick" diplomacy and push for American involvement in the Cuban War of Independence in 1898 to the more conciliatory approach of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Good Neighbor Policy in 1933. Works selected by FIU undergraduate students will be drawn from The Wolfsonian–FIU Library's collection-illustrated sheet music covers from the Spanish-American War, rare books and photographs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection, and recent gifts from donor Vicki Gold Levi.

Miami Beach: From Mangrove to Tourist Mecca
Continues through February 28, 2016
The Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue
305.531.1001 www.wolfsonian.org
The third and final installation in our library series celebrating the centennial of Miami Beach, Miami Beach: From Mangrove to Tourist Mecca documents the city's fledgling years. Sculpted by pioneering developers such as Carl Fisher, Miami Beach blossomed during the 1920s into a winter tourist hotspot catering to the wealthy elite. Photographic albums of "hotels" -the Nautilus, Flamingo, King Cole, and others- show how these self-contained luxury resorts lured the rich and famous south with regattas, elephant rides, and amenities such as tennis courts, golf courses, polo fields, private bungalows, and yacht docks.

Philodendron: From Pan-Latin Exotic to American Modern
Continues through February 28, 2016
The Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue
305.531.1001 www.wolfsonian.org
Central and South American flora take center stage in Philodendron, a sprawling exhibition that charts the migration of tropical plants from their native habitats to North American and European gardens and interiors. Spanning three centuries and drawing together objects from the Amazon, Caribbean, and beyond, the survey explores this often-overlooked, Pan-American cultural exchange to deconstruct the "social lives" of the plants, from their influence on material culture to their impact on diverse fields ranging from the visual arts, architecture, film, and fashion to the agricultural, industrial, and medical sciences. By following the philodendron from the jungle to the home, the exhibition illustrates the myriad ways the plant shaped Western ideas of the tropics-becoming an evolving symbol for what is exotic, Latin, and modern. Philodendron includes objects created by indigenous Amazonian peoples; botanical drawings by Heinrich Schott, who first classified hundreds of Philodendron species; and works by such artists and designers as Henri Matisse, Roberto Burle-Marx, Paulo Werneck, and Erdem. This exhibition is made possible by an Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award. The Exhibition Award program was founded in 1998 to honor Emily Hall Tremaine. It rewards innovation and experimentation among curators by supporting thematic exhibitions that challenge audiences and expand the boundaries of contemporary art.

Mark Podwal: All This Has Come Upon Us....
Continues through March 13, 2016
Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, 301 Washington Avenue
305.672.5044 www.jmof.fiu.edu
The artist, author and illustrator is best known for his drawings on The New York Times OP-ED page. The exhibition features Podwal's drawings and paintings of historical threats of antisemitism, combined with verses from the Book of Psalms. With so many recent incidents of antisemitic acts throughout Europe and the U.S., and even right here in Florida, the topic has never been so relevant.

Margin of Error
Continues through May 8, 2016
The Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Avenue
305.531.1001 www.wolfsonian.org
MIND THE GAP! Dangers, safety issues, and accidental injuries of the modern age lie at the heart of Margin of Error, The Wolfsonian's upcoming exhibition focusing on the slips of caution that result when we reach too far and fall too short. Opening November 13, Margin of Error pulls back the curtain on Industrial Revolution-era and turn-of-the-20th-century mishaps, from the mundane risks of the newly mechanized workplace to dramatic catastrophes such as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, Titanic sinking, and Hindenburg explosion-infamous precursors to the train crashes, oil spills, and airbag recalls of today. Among the more than 200 examples of graphic, propaganda, and decorative art are: colorful Czech posters warning of slicing off hands and arms in the factory; quirky Italian postcards depicting workers slipping on a slick surface beside the ominous caption "hospital on the horizon"; and an eye-popping German work with an electric shock boldly bisecting the human form.

MOSAIC: Jewish Life in Florida
Ongoing
Jewish Museum of Florida, 301 Washington Avenue
305.672.5044 www.jewishmuseum.com
More than 500 photos and artifacts that depict the Jewish experience in Florida since 1763. The exhibit includes three films and a timeline wall of Jewish history.

Art & Design in the Modern Age: Selections from the Wolfsonian Collection
Ongoing
The Wolfsonian-FIU, 1001 Washington Ave
305.531.1001 www.wolfsonian.fiu.edu
$7 Non-Members, $5 Seniors/Students, Members free
The nearly 300 works on display, 1885 to 1945, provide insight into the ways design has influenced and adapted to the modern world including design-reform movements, architecture, urbanism, industrial design, transportation, world's fairs, advertising, political propaganda, and labor iconography.

Artcenter/South Florida Artists-In-Residence FREE
Ongoing
Artcenter/South Florida, 924 Lincoln Road
305.674.2728  www.artcentersf.org
ArtCenter/South Florida (ACSF) welcomes visitors to the working studios of the Artists-in-Residence.